The Mid-Career GPS Podcast

234: Land Your Dream Job! Mastering the Job Market with Josef Stetter

March 21, 2024 John Neral / Josef Stetter Season 4
The Mid-Career GPS Podcast
234: Land Your Dream Job! Mastering the Job Market with Josef Stetter
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Josef Stetter changed careers nine times and jobs 18 times before he found his dream job. Today, he is known as a career coach extraordinaire who has helped over 11,000 people land their dream job using his unique S.I.G.H. method and helping his clients stand out from their competition by asking questions such as "So what?" and "Who cares?"


Josef and I discuss the power of specificity and the art of quantifying your career wins as we discuss the pitfalls of generic job boards and the impact of industry-specific keywords, including a great tip to leverage the Indeed algorithm and your resume.


Diving into the nuances of job searching, we reveal how harnessing your passion and unique skills, such as expertise in regulatory compliance, can give you a competitive edge in the job market.


Your interview could be the moment that defines your career trajectory, and in this episode, we dissect the art of making a memorable impression. Nine words can set the stage for a powerful dialogue with potential employers, emphasizing pride, significance, and impact.


Josef shares his most memorable success story, helping someone land their dream job in less than two days.


Connect with Josef:
The Celebrate Group | Website | LinkedIn


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Speaker 1:

My guest today switched careers nine times and jobs 18 times before he landed his dream job, and those experiences led him to where he is today, because he is known as a career coach, specialist recruiter and headhunter extraordinaire who has helped over 11,000 people land their dream jobs. Today you'll hear my conversation with Joseph Stetter. Joseph shares some of his most helpful tools and you'll learn how to increase your resume's visibility on job boards such as Indeed, why using his nine power words will help you stand out and get hired, and why everything you use in your job search that means your resume, linkedin cover letter, as well as how you network and interview must answer these two very important questions. So what and who cares? Let's get started. Hello, my friends, this is the mid career GPS podcast. I'm your host, john Narrell. I help mid career professionals find a job they love or love the job they have, using my proven or step formula.

Speaker 1:

Joseph Stetter empowers professionals to succeed and grow. As an award winning and international bestselling author of 11 books, joseph brings his humor, energy, passion and full self expression into his personal and professional life. You will hear that in our conversation. With a 90% success rate of finding anyone employment in any field in under three months with proven systems. Joseph has helped someone land their dream job in less than two days. You will love that story. But to find that job you'll love. Joseph shares how he helps people take the headache out of job searching or hiring by sharing advanced strategies that maximize results. Joseph understands the importance of clear, concise, confident and conversational communication that generate results which are truly unbelievable. I hope you enjoy my conversation with Joseph Stetter. Joseph Stetter, welcome to the podcast. It's great to talk to you today. Thank you for having me. It's an honor and a pleasure John.

Speaker 1:

Well, I invited you on because you have this incredible career path and you certainly help mid career and people in general just find their dream jobs and things. But one of the most fascinating things is that you've shifted jobs nine different times and are still, as you said, leveling up. I'm wondering if you would share with us a little bit about your mid career moment with us.

Speaker 2:

I think when I made the career moment, started earlier on in my career and progressed every single time. The reason being is I come from a background where you know, get a good education, get a good job is the mindset my dad comes from. God, rest his soul. Comes from Quamnistromania. You know, work for a company for 35 years, retire and so forth. And so I started my career to please my parents. So I got into finance, did seven years of finance you could not pay me a million dollars to ever work in a bank again kind of thing Because I felt that you might get better treatment in prison than you would working for a bank.

Speaker 1:

That was my experience.

Speaker 2:

So, along the way of kind of going OK, I either got to be the best in the company or certain I got bored. So I either quit or I got fired because I never took the time to go what truly makes me happy? What do I do? What you know? Can I wake up? Oh my God, I get to do this today, and that led me through nine career changes and you know ups and down.

Speaker 2:

I had a business partner that cost me or I shouldn't say cost me, I will rephrase my wording taught me a $360,000 life lesson, and that was kind of the breaking point, because I went from, you know, making hand over fist money to I can't afford to live. I have to move back in with my parents, I have to this. And so I really started evaluating what it is that I want to do and I realized I want to serve people and I want to help them find their path. A lot of people might think that they know how to look for a job, but the reality is, if they're doing what the cookie cutter standard is that they learned in careers or that they learned in, you know, a government assistance office they're getting stuck. They're not getting any, and so I started spending time to go. Let's educate you on the things that should be happening. That will make a huge difference for you.

Speaker 1:

When you help people find their dream job, how do you define what a dream job is?

Speaker 2:

Again, it's different for every single person. One of the questions that I'll ask people is security, income, growth or happiness, otherwise known as a side principle. Which one do you put first? If somebody puts income first, they're generally sales, marketing, direction. If they're putting security, it's the accounting, the engineering. If they're putting growth, they want to know that their contributions matter, and if they're putting happiness, it's about making a difference.

Speaker 2:

So by asking them, what are your hobbies, what are your interests, what are things that you enjoyed when you were younger but you stopped doing many years ago because life happened right? And based on that, I can kind of start guiding them in from your career so far. For those that are going through the midlife crisis, for example, what are the things that you enjoyed the most and what are the things that you didn't enjoy? So for myself, I recruit accountants. I don't want to be an accountant. I don't want to spend a day looking at an Excel spreadsheet and doing accountants. That's not what I'm passionate about. So I have no problem paying a good accountant to do that. But if you're passionate about accounting, more power to you. But now hone in. What aspects of accounting are you passionate about? Is it doing an audit? Is it helping people with their taxes? Is it creating those very complicated spreadsheets? There's different skill sets that the more you granularly look at where you're at, the more you can go. Wait, I actually enjoy this the most, and then we can kind of focus on getting you to do something. That involves a lot of that and that's where the dream career comes, because it's not for me to define what is a dream job. It's for me to define what will make you happy at work. Sadly, the statistics say that 80 to 90% of people in North America hate their job and if you look at the top 10 reasons why they hate their job, salary is actually number seven. It's the culture of the company, it's the lack of growth opportunity, it's the fact that they feel stuck because nobody is welcoming new ideas or there's no energy so they might love the profession.

Speaker 2:

Like my father God rest his soul was a civil engineer for 45 years. Did he have bosses that he hated? Yes, but he chose to sacrifice his happiness to provide for the family, and I respect and admire him for that and for him. As long as he worked in the world of construction, that was ideal for him. The environment was reflected on, I'm providing for my family or I get to do this project that I want to be my who raw moment kind of thing.

Speaker 2:

But when I always ask him, would you go back and redo it now that you've experienced 45 years, he always said yes, you always love the challenges of it. He always have said so. There's a level where, again, you might love what you're doing but you're stuck at the company and you've kind of been passed for promotions. You've been told you're a little bit too mature. You've been told that you have too much experience and you're too much expensive. And so it's now. How do I take this and show the highlight reel so that other companies maybe competitors of the company I'm currently working for recognize what I bring to the table?

Speaker 1:

for example, Well and that's so important to share because as people start getting greater clarity about where they see their career going and, to your point, it absolutely is it is an individual journey and an individual experience. And then what I often see as well and I'm curious from your point too but for mid-career professionals, they oftentimes default to finding a job that what worked for them when they were right out of college. They think, oh, they got to apply for a job online. Or they know they need to be networking and they need to do all these things. But somehow, when they get to mid-career, life gets busier and they're raising their families and they're maybe taking care of aging parents and they get overwhelmed by all of the things they think they quote unquote should be doing. There is something in your bio where you talk about navigating this abyss right, this like abyss for the ATS and job seeking and stuff. Talk to us a little bit about why that is such an abyss and where it often tricks people up.

Speaker 2:

So most people default to, let's say, applying for jobs and job boards like Indeed Indeed, in my opinion, one of the worst places to look for a job, because one job posting on Indeed will get between 350 and 5000 applications. Most companies today will default to look at the first 100. So if you're 101 and you don't know little tricks like, for example, most of the job boards refresh their database between 11.45 PM and 2.45 AM Eastern Standard Time. So if you have a resume uploaded on Indeed and you haven't touched it since, let's say, october, you're probably on page 7000, no one sees you. But if you go on your resume and press space bar anywhere on the resume and press save, you go into the resume refresh as a new resume. So now your chances of being seen are a lot higher. The other problem is that most people fill their resumes with the action words manage, directly, ace, coordinated, et cetera, et cetera. But here's the problem the algorithms for the job boards measures the technical words associated with your profession. So if you're an accountant, it's measuring the word accounting, accountant, financial statement, general ledger, reconciliation, not manage directly, ace, coordinate. So fill the information and then also highlight the results that you produce. This is the biggest mistake that most people that are job seekers make they go.

Speaker 2:

I know how to do this. So I always give these two examples. If you're hiring a receptionist and someone comes to you and says I know how to answer the phone, I hope, john, as the employer, you look at that person. Go, really A receptionist that knows how to answer the phone. We did not know that Because, unless you live in an igloo, a cave, or practice the faith of Mennonite, at least in North America, every single person knows how to press the green button, go hello. How can I help you? My three and a half year old daughter presses phones on my and goes hello and knows how to answer the phone. Now, yeah, but if a receptionist comes and says to you I know how to answer 60 calls a day with 12 different lines, I can measure. 60 calls a day with 12 different lines. I cannot measure. I know how to answer the phone.

Speaker 2:

If I use an example from my own career, I can tell you I'm an excellent sales person. I know how to do B2B, b2c, account management, relationship building, lead generation. I've worked retail. I've done door to door sales. I've done car sales. I've worked in private education. I've worked in recruitment. Those are all very important for the algorithms for job boards, but I haven't told you whether or not any good it is. But if I give you an example, say, I worked for a private college that, before I came in, generated $520,000 for the entire year. In one month I generate $860,000 in sales for them. Which one would convince you more that I know how to sell the words or the results?

Speaker 2:

Most people that get lost in this often don't look and reflect and go wow, I've produced so much in my career. Whether it's this small or this big or huge, the reality is what you might think is small and insignificant could be the most important thing to the company that's interviewing you. So we often dismiss ourselves before we started. I think the best analogy for that is if you've ever seen the movie up in the air with George Clooney when he fires the manager and the manager's making $90,000, he goes okay, so what? Ei is going to pay me $360 and how am I going to pay for my kid's medication? And George Clooney looks and goes. Your kid's being proud of you is very important to you, isn't it? And he goes. Yeah, and he goes. I don't think they've ever been proud of you. And then he says you studied at Port-au-Mblu to be a chef. How much did they pay you to first give up on your dreams? And then the manager pause goes $28,000.

Speaker 2:

And then life happened and you got stuck in the routine. And this is what happens for people that are midlife, that kind of took a job because it was a good job out of university and all of a sudden they've been working there for 20 years and they forgot. You know what I used to love this. I used to do this. I used to be so creative and I haven't had creativity in my life. I always tell my clients you know, if you are a musician, even if you get $100 a month to gig once a month, that $100 is going to mean more to you than your entire South, right? So don't eliminate out of your life. Okay, you weren't a professional musician in terms of you know big superstar, but keep it in your life.

Speaker 2:

And then when you go and do inventory, you know what. This is what I want. You know, like when I was single I remember I did that for my own self as well I asked women like what do you look for in a guy? Majority of women responded to me I know what I don't want, but that wasn't my question. My question was what do you want? And we tend to focus so much more on the negative than the positive.

Speaker 2:

If people started going, you know what, whatever religion you believe in? God, buddha, allah, gifted me with this ability, gifted me with this knowledge, gifted me with this talent, with these skills. How can I leverage that? You know, I'll give you an example. I have a client that's expanding into North America right now and they specialize in regulatory compliance in the banking world and you know, with Wells Fargo getting hit with $350 million in compliance and most of the other banks not doing enough due diligence on know your client, know your business, know your investor, they're now offering a platform to be able to do this for banks and, you know, invest a couple of million dollars to not be fined $300 million, for example. They asked me to find them both a sales professional and a kind of customer relations manager.

Speaker 2:

The customer relations manager that I presented has background in agile technology and implementing technology with very little to no actual compliance back, but they loved her energy, they love the fact that she understands technology and she can go after the sale into a bank and talk to the executives about the software that they use, about how to track things, how to make things more efficiently. And so she was the least, on technical skills, qualified for the job, but her energy, her presence, her excitement made all the difference For the people that are going back to me, and that's why I started the conversation and this interview with you, john, is what are you passionate about? If you enjoy this, how can you apply that as part of your day-to-day routine so that those creative juices are flowing, so that that energy, if you're surrounded by people that dismissed your abilities, find new people?

Speaker 1:

Absolutely no, and I appreciate you driving home the point about how results matter. So oftentimes we see job seekers get caught up to your point in those technical words but not really driving home a metric or a data point or something that really reflects their impact and what it was that they did. But additionally, what you offered, joseph, was that look, if you're not really excited about that, find something that you are, hey there. Have you ever been hesitant to like a LinkedIn post about finding a new job because you're fearful of being seen by your employer or colleague? I get it. I see you, my friend.

Speaker 1:

Since you're already listening to this podcast, I want to help you get an even bigger win in your career and to do that, I'm inviting you to join my free email community and subscribe to the mid-career GPS newsletter. It's delivered to your inbox twice each week with helpful tips, strategies and resources to help you find that job you love, or love the job you have. It's all free and you can subscribe by visiting my website at johnnarrellcom. Check the show notes or my LinkedIn. For now, let's get back to the episode Right, and so often on the podcast we talk about how mid-career professionals get to be memorable, what makes them stand out when they're applying for jobs.

Speaker 1:

They're networking, even if they're in an organization they really enjoy working. There's still this bit about being memorable. You have several tips to help job seekers, as you describe as to help them wow the interviewer, correct. I wonder if you could share one of them with us to just to help people who might be actively interviewing right now, to help them be a little bit more memorable or, to use your word, kind of wow them a little bit more and make them stand out in the interview process.

Speaker 2:

I will give you the heart of what I teach to people. So I like to teach people nine. I'll call them power words, proud significance, success, contributions, achievements, accomplishments, results, importance and impact. Now you don't have to use all nine words, but if you go to interview, I'm really proud of the fact that I built a call center from scratch that generated $2.25 million in under six months and an expectation of 300, you're not proud of that? No, if you're proud, I'm proud of the fact that your shoulder blades are gonna be back, your chest is gonna be out. You're gonna be speaking from your diaphragm.

Speaker 2:

So, depending on the profession that you're doing, again, if let's say you're an engineer, you can say, well, one of my biggest accomplishments was building this bridge or this whatever, that is kind of thing. Right, and tell me a little bit about why that project is so significant. You know, and again it goes back to what's your highlight reel. So I always coach people like this if you're lucky enough to be in a relationship, when you go home and tell your partner about your job I'm not talking about the days where, like, yeah, I did my job today I'm talking about those days where you come to your partner you'll never guess what happened today, like they asked me to solve this like ridiculously big problem for the company and I spent the whole day thinking about it and they came up with a brilliant solution that's gonna save the company hundreds of thousands of dollars and it's gonna increase efficiency by 30%. And we're gonna do this and we're gonna do that. That's what you need to share. That's the excitement.

Speaker 2:

So, whether it's on your resume or an interview, if you don't answer this, so what? Who cares? What's in it for them or what's the end result that you produced? I don't care. What you can do or don't do. Just because you have a designation doesn't mean anything to me. You know, I talk to like my clients, for example, in accounting, tell me that millennials today have learned how to memorize a textbook. But the people that become partners, the people that become CFOs, are the people that know how to communicate.

Speaker 2:

First of all, right and think outside the little box, because a good tax accountant will go oh John, you have an LLC, so you can defer this tax, or you can put that here and you can do this, and now you're paying a Lot less taxes, and that's that's why I pay for a good accountant because they know this stuff. I don't Right and it's the same thing for any other. You know a lawyer. You have a business lawyer to protect you In nuances of legalities that could come back to haunt you. You have good marketers that can create SEO because they can prove results. You know, if I have an Instagram, if I open an Instagram account and they go from zero to two hundred people, anybody can do that. But if I hire you to do Instagram for me and you take me from zero to ten thousand all organic, non fake leads that I bought on.

Speaker 2:

You know fiverr for 100 bucks then Then you are good at doing that and I want to pay people that are that good the midlife crisis people. They have experience and they have knowledge. You know, when my father passed away he was in charge. He was a senior director operation in charge of tearing down 16 apartment buildings and converting them into condos. When he passed, the company tried to save some money and Hired one of the project managers that he was mentoring to replace him. Because they didn't want to pay his level of salary Right, because my father was making around 200k and they figured this is a more junior product manager. They could pay about a hundred 220k.

Speaker 2:

After a month and a half he came to the company and he said I have no idea how Adrian that's my dad was able to handle or deal with 16 buildings. I'm gonna have a nervous breakdown. So they ended up hiring six or seven people at a hundred to a hundred twenty thousand dollars, instead of hiring one good one for two hundred thousand dollars that knows what they're doing. And this goes directly to the focus of the show the people that are in the midlife. They've earned the right to say they know what they're doing, they've done it, they have experience and they need to highlight that experience in a level where other companies go. This company must be crazy not to appreciate how good you are, not to let your expertise guide. Whatever the next thing is needs to be and I think this is where most people get lost is they go. I do my job, I'm good at it. I know how to do this. I don't care that you know how to do it.

Speaker 1:

Correct. Yeah, so we talk about Standing out and having that highlight rail and being memorable. I Would be remissed if I didn't ask you how did you help someone land their dream job in two days?

Speaker 2:

So I'll give you Two quick examples of this.

Speaker 1:

Sure.

Speaker 2:

So, starting with my now wife, when we started dating, my wife was a behavior therapist. She needed to get 97% on her evaluation. She got 96 and the Organization told her that they're letting her go. She'd been working there for three years Right. She cried for a couple days and then I reminded her that at the time we were dating, I'm like you're dating one of the top 10 career gurus in North America. We wrote a resume. She sent out seven resumes on Sunday, had three companies called her on Monday, book interviews with her on Tuesday. She had three interviews on Tuesday, three job offers on Tuesday, all of them for more money than she was making. Wow, right.

Speaker 2:

The second example, and this is like I'm an avid salsa dancer and when I started dancing, my partner was still in college Studying graphic design. There was an internship for a telecom company that she wanted. She called me and she's like I really, really, really want this job. I'm like, okay, really want you got to trust me. I'm going to be like mr Miyagi from the karate kid wax on, wax up, do exactly I said. I said first thing is the word graphic and design appear in your job. You are not allowed to have a black and white cookie cutter resume Because the word graphic and designing your job. So we made her resume green instead of using the typical Black circle or dots that everybody uses. She had like for her signature, for graphic design like a, like a dancing guy Sorry, I'm after servers or I can't lift bullsolders. A dancing guy Uh, as everyone, we made that a boy. She was a bearstead, a coffee shop. We made that graphic design because she designed images on the latte's, for example.

Speaker 2:

She sent her resume. Two weeks go by. She calls me, goes. You suck. They didn't even call me. An hour later they called her.

Speaker 2:

The director personally called her and said listen, we received 7400 applications for 20 unpaid internships. Your resume was one of our favorites. Nice, now, because we've Gotten so many applicants, we're going to do a three interview process. Your first interview is going to be in two days. So she called me. Oh my god, oh my god. They called me. What do you do? What do I do? I said first of all, a politics to me. Then I said to her okay, I want you first to organize all of your digital art Somewhere that's very easily accessible. You don't need a lot of passport, we can throw it away. At that time flicker was very popular. I said I want you to go to kinkos or granite toys or staples wherever you go and print your 10 pest pieces of work On glossy, high quality, even if it costs you 40 dollars to have it ready to go. I taught her my seven rules to a wow interview.

Speaker 2:

She went into the interview two days later, all of minutes into her first interview. The director put down his pen, looks at her and said listen, I've been running this program for 10 years. I have never been so impressed with the candidate as I am with you. I'm not even bothering with a second and third interview. Congratulations, you're my first hire for the internship. So again, two days turn around, can I say so? At the end of the day, if you present the right information in the correct highlight reel, you set the standard for everybody else.

Speaker 1:

I love how you said that there's such great examples of what great success stories to add to all the others that you have and everything. Joseph, you've added so much to this conversation and helping mid-career professionals today. I really appreciate it. As we start wrapping up, what advice do you want to leave with them to help them build their mid-career GPS?

Speaker 2:

So I'm going to give kind of, we'll call it three tips. The first is do an inventory of what drives you. What's your like, you know? Is it your kids? Is it money? Is it accreditation? Is it people giving you a pat on the back? What drives you?

Speaker 2:

Second thing you want to do is be different. Stop making your resume cookie cutter. Add a little bit of color, change the font, change the bullets, you know, give me results, most importantly, right. And the third thing I'm going to say is make sure that you come in with energy. Not, I need a job, but here's what you will lose if you don't hire me. Not please, please, please. I'm really hardworking and dedicated, committed to player, right. But here's what you're going to lose if you don't understand the value I bring to the table and know what your value is.

Speaker 2:

What I'd say is the most important, because most people I speak to have never looked at their value unless they've had feedback that says they're doing great work, but they've never set back and go. What was I responsible for? What did I contribute? Even if you're part of a team, I don't care. I want to know what your contributions were, because anything can be quantified and as long as you're quantifying relative to the job you're looking for, then that is how you stand out and don't waste your time simply going on. I'll add this as a bonus yes, use job boards, but start using employment agencies or recruiters. Start going to networking events. Start, you know, being more active online in company conversations, because they track that and making sure your LinkedIn profile doesn't say I'm a good worker.

Speaker 1:

I laugh because, yes, it's so true, right? Because you get your point earlier about you know. So what? Who cares? It's those things. That doesn't make them stand out at all. So, joseph, thank you so very, very much for this conversation. I'm going to turn the mic over to you now. I'd love for you to share with us where people can find you, connect with you, learn about you and your programs. The mic's yours.

Speaker 2:

So the easiest and best way is Joseph Stetter. You can find me on most social media. I'm most active on LinkedIn and Facebook, but I'm present everywhere. I do have a podcast. Again, if you type my name Stetter, think of the word Stutter, but with an E instead of a U. I'm pretty much the only Stetter out there and especially the only Joseph. They're connect with me.

Speaker 2:

You know I run kind of regular webinars to help people to answer their questions, whether it's industry specific, individual specific of hey, this is a true like I've been self-employed for 10 years, how do I transition back to the workforce? Because I have to show that I'm ready to be in the workforce. For example, you know to you know pretty much, with the exception of a few I'll use the word very creative Google interview questions. There isn't an interview question I haven't seen. I've spent 30,000 hours to master everything there's to know about job finding so that I can give back.

Speaker 2:

My personal game is to help 1.8 million people land their dream job. Right now. The statistics say there's a close to 60 million people that are unemployed. There's 60 million people that are severely underemployed, ie have a university or college education but work at McDonald's, and then another 30 million or so going through some sort of educational retraining. So if I'm not the expert for you because you don't like my personality or my background, please find someone that can hold your hand and support you. I know John you're in the same realm, so John's a great resource for you Because, again, you don't know what you don't know and John and I have spent the time to kind of go here's what you need to know, to be educated so that you have better opportunities in front of you and that companies wake up from their coma and go oh my God, I need to hire you yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, it's it's. It's one of the reasons why we connect, because it's. This is such great work that we get to do and whoever we get to help and how many people we get to help is all part of our mission and everything. You are a phenomenal expert in this space. I'm so glad we connected. Joseph Stetter, thank you for being such a great guest on the Mid Career GPS podcast.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for having me. It's been an honor and a pleasure.

Speaker 1:

Well, same. So, my friends, look, if there's one big takeaway from my conversation with Joseph, I want to offer you this what's your highlight reel? How are you standing out? Where are you memorable? What are you saying and doing, both writing on your resume and optimizing your LinkedIn profile that is making you stand out. So when somebody looks at it and they go, so what, who cares? They answer it with the evidence that you have produced about the results you have gained and achieved throughout your career that make you an exceptionally valuable talent to your current or your next organization.

Speaker 1:

So until next time, my friends, remember this you will build your mid-career GPS one mile or one step at a time, and how you show up matters. Make it a great rest of your day. Thank you for listening to the Mid Career GPS podcast. Make sure to follow on your favorite listening platform and, if you have a moment, I'd love to hear your comments on Apple Podcasts. Visit JohnNarrowcom for more information about how I can help you build your mid-career GPS or how I can help you and your organization with your next workshop or public speaking event. Don't forget to connect with me on LinkedIn and follow me on social at JohnNarrowCoaching. I look forward to being back with you next week. Until then, take care and remember how we show up matters.

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